Marketing Agencies Gauteng

Marketing Agencies in Cape Town ;  focus their efforts solely on experiential marketing; and others not do anything but direct marketing. Integrated marketing agencies, nevertheless, are a completely different kettle of fish.

Integrated advertisng companies are a little bit like Toys R South Africa. Ok, they’re not “magical places” with “toys in their millions all under one roofing system.” However, if you change the word “toys” with “marketing services”, you’ve pretty much strike the nail on the head.

Essentially, incorporated marketing agencies are business that can satisfy all of their clients’ marketing requires under one roofing system.

Integrated strategic marketing firms have the capability, resources and knowledge to carry out a range of various marketing methods in one cohesive effort. These companies boast big teams of experts with different locations of knowledge across a large range of marketing and interactions disciplines.
These various teams then work together to make sure their customers’ projects are as effective, meaningful, constant, harmonious and, for that reason, as efficient as possible.

Marketing Services Company 

interesting marketing news
A lot of integrated companies provide a combination of all, or a few of, the following services: digital marketing, direct marketing, experiential marketing, PR, advertising, guerilla marketing, social media, sales promotion, B2B communications, mobile marketing, buyer marketing, sponsorship, CRM, graphic style, copy-writing and brand name strategy.
Our company is not just another advertising agency. Our method permits us to produce special projects that run across the board. We do not outsource a single element of our work. Every campaign is produced, handled and carried out in-house. A strong project requires a strong marketing strategy. What works best for them won’t work best for you. That’s why we strategise. Our proficiency extends beyond basic advertising. From social networks, print, outside and web, we develop everything needed to build extraordinary results. Having managed a few of the largest brand names in the South Africa and established campaigns throughout the country, we know what works best for you. Whatever we do is customised for your business. Always. You get the best results for your needs, and it’s always constructed for you.
The world of marketing is moving more towards digital. From marketing to inbound marketing, digital is an economical and adaptable medium to market your business in.

Latest News for Marketing Agencies Cape Town

small business advertising

Are you having a hard time to accomplish your marketing objectives? Call our consultants into take a look over your approach and recommend on more reliable ways to market your company. We offer hourly consulting services to review your advertising, branding and marketing techniques.
No marketing works without a detailed strategy. Our specialists are experienced at creating methods and plans for a broad range of markets, focusing on the best marketing aspects and messages that accomplish the company’s short and long term goals.
Brands enjoy us because we are an unique tactical marketing agency. We combine the technique and imaginative branding skills of a standard advertising agency with the production abilities of the world’s top-ranked event marketing firm. All our customer relationships are tactically handled – we’ve established our procedures and tools to join method and innovative so that even the smallest detail is vital.

What is Digital Marketing?

marketing strategy news

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

I spent a few days last week with 10,000 digital marketers, enveloped by all things Adobe at their Adobe Summit event. They paid me to cover the event as an insider. It was my first-ever Adobe event, and I was impressed. Adobe Summit is a classy confab in every respect.

The combination of speakers was especially well handled, with a combination of Adobe personnel, partners and industry types, and celebs (including George Clooney, Abby Wambach, Donny Osmond, and Thomas Middleditch — star of the HBO show Silicon Valley). It seemed like a too-eclectic mix at first, but Adobe did a very good job keeping a consistent messaging thread throughout the 3-day event:

The business of the future is powered by customer experience.

In the opening general session, Adobe’s Brad Rencher defined the characteristics of an “experience business” as a firm that offers these four benefits to customers:

  • Know and respect me
  • Speak in 1 voice
  • Make technology transparent
  • Delight me at every turn

Is Customer Experience New, or Just Newly Buzzed About?

The analyst and futurist Brian Solis spoke at Adobe Summit too, also hewing to the customer experience is critical theme, and summarizing key points from his book on the topic (I reviewed Brian’s book “X” here).

Brian emphasized that customer experience is the new differentiator, but I’m not certain I agree.

Customer experience is of course a differentiator. People will willingly pay more to interact with brands that offer superior experience. Feelings as currency is real, as long as you live in circumstances where you can afford to prioritize them.Casting aside a product because another offers better emotional resonance and ease-of-use is the very best kind of #FirstWorldProblem.

So I can certainly agree that customer experience shifts customer preference (and just published my own book that touches on the theme). But hasn’t customer experience always been one of the ways we choose where to spend?

Liberal return policies. Drive thrus. Open 24-hours. Bags fly free. Dogs welcome. Free dessert for kids. These are all business components that have been around for years (decades, in some cases). We used to call them “building a better mousetrap.” Now, the world of marketing and business has collectively agreed to call them elements of “superior customer experience.”

Fair enough. But let’s not pretend that giving your customers a better, faster, easier interaction is some 2016 invention. It’s not.

The Power of Analog Customer Experience

Particularly striking, in fact, was a session with the legendary musician Donny Osmond. Osmond remains a strong draw in Las Vegas even though he’s been in the business for a full 50 years, and just released his 60th album (!!!).

Osmond talked about how he stays relevant in changing times by expanding his audience and repackaging his content. Smart man.

My favorite part, however, was when he talked about the “purple cards” segment he incorporates into his live show at The Flamingo. Before each, his team finds two dozen or so interesting audience members, and gives them a purple index card and a marker. They are invited to write down a question or request for Donny.

During the performance, Osmond reads the purple cards, answers questions, does requests, sings Happy Birthday, etc. delivering a remarkable customer experience to the card-writing fans, and due to the extreme customization and personalization of each show, creates a bespoke version of a seven times per week gig.

Donny Osmond needs no software to deliver a great customer experience. He understands that customer experience is first and foremost a human-powered endeavor. For Donny Osmond, customer experience lives in your DNA, not your marketing cloud.

The Battle Between Hearts and Minds

This is the challenge faced by modern business.

We have more software than ever to provide the scaffolding for heightened customer experience. Adobe announced some very nifty innovations at Summit, and their “smart shopping bag” technology and new “immersive retail experience” could revolutionize bricks and clicks businesses if and when it’s widely deployed.

But software alone will not create great experiences. It’s just the gas in the engine.

As always, marketing that wins customer hearts and minds is about the wizard, not the wand.

And the wizards aren’t ready to meet the challenge. The irony was thick when vendors at Adobe Summit spammed the hashtag with marginally relevant tweets DURING a keynote on the need for personalized marketing and better customer experiences.

The smart and savvy marketers, Pam Moore and Ken Burbary were also at Summit as insiders, and the three of us had a fun and fascinating dinner where the topic turned to this issue:

Why, when they have at their disposal technology that is easy(ish) and affordable(ish) do so many companies still rely on techniques and tactics that clearly do not meet the test of great customer experience?

I believe it’s because for premise of personalized customer journeys and 1:1 marketing to take root, brands must commit to experimentation. And experimentation requires an appetite for risk that most brands do not have because it’s not culturally acceptable to fail.

Said in a shorter, tweet-friendly way:

To deliver great customer experiences brands must embrace experimentation, risk, and failure. (highlight to tweet)

Pam had lunch the following day with several representatives from a large insurance company, and they inadvertently ratified this thesis (which I also witness consistently in our consulting practice here at Convince & Convert). Pam asked them why they weren’t making use of more of the outstanding Adobe technology to improve their marketing, especially in personalization and customization.

Paraphrasing, the answers were:

“We want to, but we can’t get budget. The CMO just wants to constantly study new software, but nothing gets implemented. Our job is to run reports that help the CMO keep his job.”

So this is the state of modern marketing. Technology is outstripping our ability to adopt it because the pace of change on the software side is so much faster than the pace of change on the organizational and corporate culture side.

For us to be able to actually harness the power of experience-led businesses, we need to focus as much on the wizard as on the wand.

Any meaningful improvement in customer experience through marketing tech must start first in the heart, and then move to the head. If your organization doesn’t really and truly believe at the molecular level that customer experience is transformative, you’ll never embrace the risk enough to reap the reward.

Thanks again to Adobe for bringing me out to Adobe Summit. I learned a lot and restoked some fires.

Marketing Agencies in Cape Town

website marketing strategy

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

I spent a few days last week with 10,000 digital marketers, enveloped by all things Adobe at their Adobe Summit event. They paid me to cover the event as an insider. It was my first-ever Adobe event, and I was impressed. Adobe Summit is a classy confab in every respect.

The combination of speakers was especially well handled, with a combination of Adobe personnel, partners and industry types, and celebs (including George Clooney, Abby Wambach, Donny Osmond, and Thomas Middleditch — star of the HBO show Silicon Valley). It seemed like a too-eclectic mix at first, but Adobe did a very good job keeping a consistent messaging thread throughout the 3-day event:

The business of the future is powered by customer experience.

In the opening general session, Adobe’s Brad Rencher defined the characteristics of an “experience business” as a firm that offers these four benefits to customers:

  • Know and respect me
  • Speak in 1 voice
  • Make technology transparent
  • Delight me at every turn

Is Customer Experience New, or Just Newly Buzzed About?

The analyst and futurist Brian Solis spoke at Adobe Summit too, also hewing to the customer experience is critical theme, and summarizing key points from his book on the topic (I reviewed Brian’s book “X” here).

Brian emphasized that customer experience is the new differentiator, but I’m not certain I agree.

Customer experience is of course a differentiator. People will willingly pay more to interact with brands that offer superior experience. Feelings as currency is real, as long as you live in circumstances where you can afford to prioritize them.Casting aside a product because another offers better emotional resonance and ease-of-use is the very best kind of #FirstWorldProblem.

So I can certainly agree that customer experience shifts customer preference (and just published my own book that touches on the theme). But hasn’t customer experience always been one of the ways we choose where to spend?

Liberal return policies. Drive thrus. Open 24-hours. Bags fly free. Dogs welcome. Free dessert for kids. These are all business components that have been around for years (decades, in some cases). We used to call them “building a better mousetrap.” Now, the world of marketing and business has collectively agreed to call them elements of “superior customer experience.”

Fair enough. But let’s not pretend that giving your customers a better, faster, easier interaction is some 2016 invention. It’s not.

The Power of Analog Customer Experience

Particularly striking, in fact, was a session with the legendary musician Donny Osmond. Osmond remains a strong draw in Las Vegas even though he’s been in the business for a full 50 years, and just released his 60th album (!!!).

Osmond talked about how he stays relevant in changing times by expanding his audience and repackaging his content. Smart man.

My favorite part, however, was when he talked about the “purple cards” segment he incorporates into his live show at The Flamingo. Before each, his team finds two dozen or so interesting audience members, and gives them a purple index card and a marker. They are invited to write down a question or request for Donny.

During the performance, Osmond reads the purple cards, answers questions, does requests, sings Happy Birthday, etc. delivering a remarkable customer experience to the card-writing fans, and due to the extreme customization and personalization of each show, creates a bespoke version of a seven times per week gig.

Donny Osmond needs no software to deliver a great customer experience. He understands that customer experience is first and foremost a human-powered endeavor. For Donny Osmond, customer experience lives in your DNA, not your marketing cloud.

The Battle Between Hearts and Minds

This is the challenge faced by modern business.

We have more software than ever to provide the scaffolding for heightened customer experience. Adobe announced some very nifty innovations at Summit, and their “smart shopping bag” technology and new “immersive retail experience” could revolutionize bricks and clicks businesses if and when it’s widely deployed.

But software alone will not create great experiences. It’s just the gas in the engine.

As always, marketing that wins customer hearts and minds is about the wizard, not the wand.

And the wizards aren’t ready to meet the challenge. The irony was thick when vendors at Adobe Summit spammed the hashtag with marginally relevant tweets DURING a keynote on the need for personalized marketing and better customer experiences.

The smart and savvy marketers, Pam Moore and Ken Burbary were also at Summit as insiders, and the three of us had a fun and fascinating dinner where the topic turned to this issue:

Why, when they have at their disposal technology that is easy(ish) and affordable(ish) do so many companies still rely on techniques and tactics that clearly do not meet the test of great customer experience?

I believe it’s because for premise of personalized customer journeys and 1:1 marketing to take root, brands must commit to experimentation. And experimentation requires an appetite for risk that most brands do not have because it’s not culturally acceptable to fail.

Said in a shorter, tweet-friendly way:

To deliver great customer experiences brands must embrace experimentation, risk, and failure. (highlight to tweet)

Pam had lunch the following day with several representatives from a large insurance company, and they inadvertently ratified this thesis (which I also witness consistently in our consulting practice here at Convince & Convert). Pam asked them why they weren’t making use of more of the outstanding Adobe technology to improve their marketing, especially in personalization and customization.

Paraphrasing, the answers were:

“We want to, but we can’t get budget. The CMO just wants to constantly study new software, but nothing gets implemented. Our job is to run reports that help the CMO keep his job.”

So this is the state of modern marketing. Technology is outstripping our ability to adopt it because the pace of change on the software side is so much faster than the pace of change on the organizational and corporate culture side.

For us to be able to actually harness the power of experience-led businesses, we need to focus as much on the wizard as on the wand.

Any meaningful improvement in customer experience through marketing tech must start first in the heart, and then move to the head. If your organization doesn’t really and truly believe at the molecular level that customer experience is transformative, you’ll never embrace the risk enough to reap the reward.

Thanks again to Adobe for bringing me out to Adobe Summit. I learned a lot and restoked some fires.

Most Companies Can’t Yet Handle Great Marketing Technology

news in marketing

In the technological world in which we live in, many types of commerce are now done electronically and over the internet. Between the rise of online transactions and the ease of information that is passed on over the web, mastering the usage of technology has become a must-have skill for any company, big or small. Marketing in particular is a facet of business in which technological usage is very important for ensuring success.

The single best way to reach a marketable audience today is through the internet. In the past, magazine and newspaper advertisements were the strongest channel of marketing, followed by radio and television commercials. While these are all still very merit able means of marketing, they cannot compete with the speed and efficiency of internet advertising. The reason for this is that people spend more time on the internet than they do doing other marketable activities, like watching television or reading a newspaper. Most of the news and articles people read is online, so it makes sense that the bulk of their ads would also be seen online.

One of the key aspects of building a successful business is to market the goods and services being sold. By marking those products digitally, it allows the company to reach a much wider audience at a faster rate than any other medium. Moreover, market research is much easier to conduct online because of the ability to reach not only a vast amount of people, but also the ability to target certain groups of people. Consumers are also much more receptive of taking the time to complete an online survey than they are of speaking with someone with a clipboard in a mall.

By becoming proficient with digital marketing, businesses can learn much more easily how to reach consumers and cater to their needs. They are also able to reach consumers to sell products much more efficiently than ever before. To learn more about the benefits of digital marketing for your small business and how to implement it, please call the County Economic Development Council.


Meglakor Marketing Companies News